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LYF Wind 5 Review: Mediocre At Best!

If you have been following our series of LYF phones reviews so far, the last LYF phone I reviewed was the Water 10. Soon after that, I got my hands on yet another LYF phone — the Wind 5. I have been using it for a week now, and in this review, I am going to give my verdict whether this phone is worth spending your head-earned cash or not. Let’s find out!

In terms of build, the LYF Wind 5 is made out of plastic which doesn’t feel premium. The back is somewhat smooth which is why you need to handle this phone with relatively extra care. Although I haven’t performed any (un)intentional drop test on this phone, it should survive a few accidental drops.

It flaunts a 5-inch IPS LCD screen featuring 1280 x 720 pixels HD resolution and a pixel density of 294 pixels per inch (PPI). The brightness is not good under direct sunlight, resulting in poor visibility. The display is prone to fingerprints as it lacks an oleophobic coating. It also comes with 2-point multi-touch support which means you can use up to two fingers at a time while interacting with the display.

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Unlike the backlight bleeding issue on the Water 10, the Wind 5’s display had no problem at all. Right above the display sits an earpiece along with a 5-megapixel selfie camera. On the top, there is a 3.5mm audio jack and a microUSB 2.0 port. While the right side comprises a volume rocker and a power button, the left side is empty.

The Wind 5 has no capacitive touch buttons, instead, it features on-screen navigation buttons. The bottom of the phone has nothing more than a microphone. The back has an 8-megapixel primary camera, a LED flash, and a speaker grill at the bottom. The back cover is removable, giving access to both SIM cards, memory card (none of them is hot swappable), and a battery which is also removable.

As far as the camera performance is concerned, the Wind 5 houses an 8-megapixel rear snapper with a LED flash. Pictures captured and the color production was fine. However, the camera operations were lagging at times and it failed to set proper exposure. The camera also had a problem focusing on nearby objects. Noticeably, pictures captured in low-light conditions were distorted due to slower shutter speed. Moving on, it also has a 5-megapixel front shooter for selfies.

The selfie experience wasn’t as I expected it to be because pictures appear already zoomed in and clicking group selfies is impossible without a selfie stick. Similar to the Water 10, the Wind 5 also has the on-screen camera capture button leaned slightly towards right. Hence, taking a selfie while holding the device in a right hand can be an issue as your thumb will struggle to reach the capture button. But hey! The Wind 5 also captures pictures using volume rocker unlike the Water 10.

Powering the Wind 5 is a MediaTek MT6735P processor clocked at 1GHz and paired with 1GB RAM and Mali-T720 GPU for graphics. These are mostly entry-level specifications which are suitable for its price. However, when it comes to high-end gaming and graphics performance, you will be disappointed. I played a couple of games on this device such as Asphalt 8 and Temple Run 2.

I must say this phone cannot be your choice since high-end gaming on this phone is poor. Playing Temple Run 2 game was not a problem though as it ran smoothly and there was no lag at all. Soon after that, I started playing Asphalt 8 which is a very graphic-intensive game. The gameplay here was very slow and full of stutters on high visual quality settings. However, lowering it down to medium quality turned out to be comparatively better. This phone recorded AnTuTu benchmark score of 24362 which is better than that of the Wind 6, whereas the Geekbench scores for single core and multi-core performance were 377 and 977 respectively.

Apart from poor gaming and graphics performance, the Wind 5 comes with a basic 8GB storage out of which around 3GB is available for users. This isn’t sufficient for storing files, apps, or games in large numbers. In order to avoid the occasional ‘running out of enough storage’ prompts, it’s better to expand the storage further which is possible up to 32GB using microSD card. Although I didn’t observe any severe heating issues, the phone gets a little warm upon continuous gameplay or even normal usage.

The poor multitasking used to result in an overall laggy experience which might be due to 1GB of RAM. The audio performance was unpleasant which produces jarred sound output. However, putting in-ear headphones on which come in the box is helpful at times. I faced no sound issues with audio calling, though.Based on Android 5.1 Lollipop operating system, the Wind 5 like all other LYF phones, comes with a near stock UI which is clean. In spite of that, this phone is burdened with a number of apps pre-installed (including a few from Jio). These apps include NetVelocity, Fusion, and 360 Security.

While NetVelocity is a speed test and networking monitoring app, Fusion is a third-party music player. To be honest, packing in another music player simply doesn’t make sense since the phone already has its own default player. There was a problem with 360 Security app as it failed to execute. Thankfully, you can uninstall all of these apps and recover some precious internal storage which it clearly lacks in the first place.

While NetVelocity is a speed test and networking monitoring app, Fusion is a third-party music player. To be honest, packing in another music player simply doesn’t make sense since the phone already has its own default player. There was a problem with 360 Security app as it failed to execute. Thankfully, you can uninstall all of these apps and recover some precious internal storage which it clearly lacks in the first place.

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The battery performance is another disappointment. It packs in a 2300mAh battery which is removable. The phone takes really long to charge completely (around 3 hours 40 minutes) using 5V 1A charger it bundles which is annoying.The battery backup isn’t great either. This phone fails to last even a day on moderate to heavy usage while on 4G.

Considering these observations, it’s really difficult for me to recommend this phone to anyone who wants to buy a new, entry-level Android phone. Although the specifications justify the price of Rs 5,599, the overall experience isn’t very assuring. You should better consider similarly priced Xolo Era 4G which packs in slightly bigger battery and Corning Gorilla Glass protection.

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Tanmay Patange

Associate Editor at Pricebaba, Tanmay is working in the tech writing and content industry since 2011. He closely follows all trends and developments across the Tech world and admires fearless journalism. Follow him on Twitter at @techtsp.

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